Maintained with by the community

2019 Monthly Schedule

We sometimes hold our meetings in the orchard

Orchard Meeting

Lecture Room, New Mills Library, Hall Street Thursday 3rd - 7PM

Wassailing

Wassailing is an ancient Anglo-Saxon tradition which dictated that at the beginning of each year the lord of the manor would greet his assembled visitors with the toast Waes Hael, meaning "be well". The visitors would reply Drink Hael which meant "Drink Well" and so the New Year celecrations would start with a glass or two of a drink consisting of: mulled ale, cream, roasted apples, egg, honey and spices consumed in a noisy and lively way!

Pruning of the Cobnuts

(Corylus Avellana)
(if necessary)
Cobnuts are a type of Hazelnut and are the nut of the Corylus tree. They are also known as the Filbert Nut.

Pruning of the apple and pear trees

(if necessary)
We have many varietes of apples and pears in the orchard click here for more information

Orchard Meeting

Lecture Room, New Mills Library, Hall Street Thursday 7th - 7PM

Orchard Meeting

Lecture Room, New Mills Library, Hall Street Thursday 7th - 7PM

Pruning of the cherry trees

(if necessary)

Orchard Meeting

Lecture Room, New Mills Library, Hall Street Thursday 4th - 7PM

Pruning of mildewed twigs and cankers


MILDEW is a form of fungus which causes an infection in plants. It either slows down the growth of the plant or, in severe cases can kill it. CANKERS are dead sections of bark on a tree and are a symptom of an injury or open wound that has become infected by fungus. They may enlarge and strangle a twig or branch, killing the foliage beyond it.

Orchard Meeting

Lecture Room, New Mills Library, Hall Street Thursday 2nd - 7PM

Check any stakes and ties


Check all stakes and ties to make sure they are in place and protecting the trees and bushes.

Bird survey

Orchard Meeting

Lecture Room, New Mills Library, Hall Street Thursday 6th - 7PM

One World Festival


One of the High Peak's most popular events, is back for 2019! The free open air festival will be taking place on Saturday 6th July 2019, from 12pm until 6pm at High Lea Park, St Mary’s Road, New Mills. New Mills One World Festival: Celebrating themes of peace, environment, cultural diversity, community and world development. The theme for 2019 is: SEEDS OF CHANGE

Thin out apple clusters

(Late June)
Thining is the process of removing a selection of fruit from your trees while the fruit is still small. Thinning the trees ultimately benefits them as it:
  • Discourages overbearing of the fruit & early fruit drop
  • Improves the size of the remaining fruit, the colour & the quality
  • Helps to avoid limb damage to the tree from a heavy fruit load
  • Prune the Figs


    Pruning figs in early summer will help the fig tree grow side branches for a bushier tree. Pinch or cut the tips of shoots when they have formed five or six leaves. Do not prune later growth.

    Harvest Elderflowers


    Elderflowers come from the elder tree. It generally grows as shrub or small tree to a height of around 5 to 10 metres. Flat-topped clusters of tiny, creamy-white flowers appear in June. To many people the fragrance is sweet and summery. The flowers and berries are the only edible part of the plant. They are mildly toxic and have an unpleasant taste when raw. Cooking destroys the toxic chemicals. Elderflowers are ready around late May to mid-June. They’re best picked when the buds are freshly open on a warm, dry, sunny day. The fragrant flowers are most famous for making elderflower champagne and cordial – perfect summer drinks.

    Bird survey

    Orchard Meeting

    Lecture Room, New Mills Library, Hall Street Thursday 4th - 7PM

    Pull out Ragwort

    Ragwort (Senecio jacobaea) is a highly poisonous plant if eaten by horses or cattle. It thrives on uncultivated land and fields. It is a tall plant bearing large flat-topped clusters of yellow daisy-like flowers usually seen from July to October.

    Harvest Tayberries


    Fruiting season is in summer. Expect to harvest at least twice per week for several weeks. Tayberries are ripe when they easily pull off the cane, be sure to wait until fruit is ripe before picking. The fruit will ripen from red to black, but do not pick them as soon as they turn black, wait 3-4 days and pick when the color has a dull appearance. These will be the sweetest fruit. Pick in the morning or evening, when temperatures are coolest. Store in a shallow container in the fridge as soon as possible after picking. Fresh tayberries last a day or so, but they can also be frozen or used for preserves.

    Harvest Red, White and Blackcurrants


    Harvest whole trusses, rather than individual berries. Theyre ready to pick when theyve coloured up but are still firm and shiny. Pick currants on a dry day, as wet currants will quickly go mouldy. Store unwashed bunches of currants in the fridge for up to five days. Blackcurrants, redcurrants and whitecurrants all freeze well.

    Harvest Jostaberry

    Harvest Gooseberries

    Harvest Raspberries

    Harvest Cherries

    Late July

    Orchard Meeting

    Lecture Room, New Mills Library, Hall Street Thursday 1st - 7PM

    Cut grass

    Prune cherries

    (if necessary)

    Harvest Boysenberry

    Harvest Opal plum (early)


    Harvest Victoria plum (late)

    Harvest Oullins Golden Gage

    mid

    Harvest Figs

    Harvest Discovery apple

    late

    Harvest Cobnuts

    from mid

    Orchard Meeting

    Lecture Room, New Mills Library, Hall Street Thursday 5th - 7PM

    Apple Day

    Community Orchard

    Harvest Blackberries

    Harvest Clapps Favourite Pear

    Harvest Damson (early)

    Harvest Loganberry

    Harvest Japanese wineberry

    Harvest Buerre Hardy Pear (mid while hard)


    Harvest Williams Bon Chretien Pear

    Prune Plums

    (if necessary)

    Harvest James Grieve (early-mid)


    Harvest Worcester Pearmain (leave on tree as long as possible for best flavour)

    Orchard Meeting

    Lecture Room, New Mills Library, Hall Street Thursday 3rd - 7PM

    Harvest Russet apple


    Harvest Spartan apple (early mid)


    Harvest Jonagold apple (mid)


    Bramley cooking apple

    Manage hedges

    (if necessary)

    Harvest Ornamental Quince


    Harvest Real Quince

    Harvest Confrence pear

    Orchard Meeting

    Thursday 7th - 7PM
    Lecture Room, New Mills Library, Hall Street

    Harvest Confrence pear

    Harvest Newton Wonder Cooking apple

    Remove: Hawthorn, Bramble, Saplings from grassland

    Orchard Meeting

    Lecture Room, New Mills Library, Hall Street Thursday 5th - 7PM

    Remove: Hawthorn, Bramble, Saplings from grassland

    How to find us

    Meet Our Volunteers

    We manage and maintain New Mills Community Orchard

    Lance

    Chairman

    Mary Parkinson

    Treasurer

    Julian

    Daniel

    Website Developer

    Mark

    Want to see what people said about their visit?

    visit trip advisor

    Want to make a donation?

    Your donation goes directly to maintaining the orchard

    £5

    Currently unavalible

    £10

    Currently unavalible

    £20

    Currently unavalible

    £50

    Currently unavalible

    £100

    Currently unavalible